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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
day sunday at seattle city hall. 133 same-sex couples tied the knot. sarah and emily cover were among the first couples to get married. the same-sex couples married sunday in seattle were among the first to pick up their marriage licenses last thursday. the state required a three-day waiting period before ceremonies. >>> european union leaders are in oslo to receive the nobel peace prize. hundreds of protesters have been braving oslo's snow. the prize was meant to honor contributions to disarmament and eu member states account for a third of global arms exports. >> thanks, christine. >>> it is now 15 minutes after the hour. time for "early read," your local newsmaking national headlines. a big medical story in the "philadelphia enquirer." it's in a lot of papers this morning. very promising progress in the fight against leukemia. this is happening in the university of pennsylvania where doctors are using gene therapy to irrad indicate certain cancer cells. the first cases, seven of them are now free of the disease. the findings are already being presented by penn's research team. they
. and seattle is another pretty wels we-posione employme ba and we've seen good sales up there. >> tom: from the east coast to the west coast with toll brothers chief financial officer martin connor with us. >> susie: investors are trading on headlines, and the head is all about fiscal cliff. yesterday the dow was up 100 points. today down 100 points all because the headlines weren't looking at favorable. >> tom: just very sensitive to any of the rhetoric coming out of washington for the stock market here, susie. in our "market focus," we can see indications of that. from the post-election highs we destda and the selling picked up a little bit as the day wore on today. here is the trade for the s&p 500. the s&p 500 slipped into the red within the first 20 minutes of trading, with the losses growing in the afternoon to end at the lowest level of the session, down 0.8%. trading volume was 747 million shares on the big board. just under two billion on the nasdaq. all 10 major stock sectors were down. the telecommunications sector saw the biggest drop, off 1.2%. health care fell 1.1%. consumer s
magnuson's house in seattle reminisce about their days together, and some of those stories i can share on the floor and some i couldn't. but they were longtime friends. and the one story that is written about in warren magnuson's biography by shelby scates is a story about how the two of them, both appropriators, when mount saint helen's grew up, senator magnuson went to senator inouye and said, we need about a billion dollars for the cleanup of mount saint helen's. if you can manly in 198 -- imagine in 1980 what a tremendous amount of money that was. senator inouye's response was, senator magnuson, we have volcanos blowing up all the time in hawaii and we never get a dime. and senator magnuson's response was, just wait, it will be your turn soon. so these are two individuals that forged a relationship, and along with jackson, were some of the big giants of our day in the united states senate. and we certainly in the state of washington benefited greatly from senator inouye's incredible help and support. i know that he traveled to our state many times at my request and participated in
again at the west seattle fix it collector. >> a group of that's like to get together and help each other fix whatever we own. >> from sewing machines to fans to lawn mowers, if it is broke they will try to fix it repair groups have flourished in europe and spreading to the united states. >> i like the idea of reusing something that has already had a life, already been built and created most of its environmental foot prints. >> members of the fix it collectors in brooklyn help people save the planet and a buck or two. >> throw away culture motivates a lot of us to come here and try to fight it. the economy definitely played a role. minute it breaks or the newest gadget comes out they have to get the new one and throw the old one away. it's expensive and what are we doing to the planet. >> so big in europe they attract up to half a million dollars in grants. not so here in the united states, shep. it's usually five bucks jamie i can see you with a phillips screwdriver fix that all over you. thank you so much. dominic, great story. sign of the time, folks. when you lose your job you m
antonio tx or me living in concord or seattle for miami. you can make it directly relevant and interesting to cuba's lives. the more interest there will be. >> thank you so much to each of you for coming. i want to draw on a couple of things. as the education director with the power and passion of my generation wanting -- one of the things that i think is so critically missing is clear pathways to support the translation of informed inspiration and its desire to be part of interaction. i was curious it, if we had to lift up in a three-year window, how do we prioritize the leverage point in terms of production? is it a rebate system? will it make a difference in the general public? my generation of young people would want to be a solution to the change. >> that is a whole other panel. as scientists, our job is to solidify the suns with the best possible information. honestly, i am thankful that i am not in policy making because that is the hardest thing to do. but i believe that there is a great amount of low-hanging fruit. there are a lot of things that we can do, leaving climate out of it
for the wall street journal, news day, and up until six months ago i was managing a print shop in seattle, selling business cards to microsoft employees. so i it was kind of a shock to the system, and the term "dark horse" gets used quite a bit in regards to my chances here. but we -- it was an incredible shift towards the positive. i mean, nice to have these dramatic shifts for the better in your life. normally they're -- when something this big happens it's usually for the negative but this time it's very much for the positive. so we were quite pleased. >> what is brownsville like today? >> my experience with it when i went back, it was like so much -- >> saw family there? >> my father still lives there and my grandmother. i made the trip to sort of get the blessings, both literally and figuratively, and it was different. the house we grew up in is no longer there. it's been sold two or three times. graham's house is still intact. still as creepy as ever. and there's a sense of peace there anymore. it's like she is very much living in her late stages of life, and much more calm as a hum
finished what she calls one of the best runs of her life, here at crystal mountain, south of seattle. >> it was amazing. >> reporter: when she looked down and saw the snow moving strangely beneath her. >> i saw a crack. and you hear a little pop when it starts to go. i realized it was an avalanche. it pushed me into a tree. and all of a sudden, i was encased. and i couldn't move. >> reporter: she was buried. her first thought, above everything else, how to breathe. her left hand could move just enough to get the snow away from her mouth. >> my head was down, facing down a little bit. and so, i, like, had to kind of scoop the snow away. i breathed in snow a little bit. that was scary. >> reporter: that's what saved your life, having that left hand free to get a little bit away. >> yeah. i was, like, kind of in a sitting position. and my right arm was stuck out to my side. >> reporter: couldn't move it? >> yeah. couldn't move it. >> reporter: and the second wave hit her. a wave of fear she might not be found. >> i felt very alone. i felt like, you know, this could be it. >> reporter: a
is a painkiller. what do you see in seattle? >> if you pull a group of people together from this community, someone in that group will have had a friend, loved one, who has had difficulty with a prescription drug or potentially died from that. >> reporter: his unit responds to 45 calls a month for overdoses of these types of medications. it can be difficult to tell if it's painkiller or heroin, because they come from the same ingredient and do the same sort of thing to your body. >> aside from needle tracks in the arms, someone who has had an overdose of pain medication like that, they can look very much the same. >> very much. they can be unconscious from medication that they think is relatively safe for them because of instead of getting on the street they get it from a pharmacist. possible drug overdose. these people are suffering from chronic pain. they know that a little bit of pain medication helps, so maybe a lot would help a lot more. >> reporter: when we arrive, another medic is on the scene. >> somewhere in that parking garage there is a call about someone having a drug overdose.
you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. -- a single currency. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, and to reach far too much into the future to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was that generation's version of 2008. -- the collapse of 1929, which was that generation's version of 2008. when that collapse happened, w
in maryland, steph, mama in september i sent my sister to your show in seattle but i became jealous. why must the sexy liberal tour be so far away then the heavens responded with the announcement. i didn't just get three. i get all four plus jim and chris and hopefully jacki. i might be able to hear chris giggle in person. maybe. >> give me cheese. i'll giggle for you any time, anywhere. >> stephanie: got my meet and grope tickets. can't wait to finally meet you. [ screaming ] >> stephanie: me too! sexy liberal tour director roland is high-strung. something that took me by surprise. the third biggest onsale ever beating new york city. hello. let's see. right now entire orchestra section, more than half sold. down to 25 meet and greets. it is really -- >> four years ago we witnessed the first inauguration of president barack obama. ♪ like a virgin ♪ >> in november, america decided one term wasn't enough. ♪ do that to me one more time ♪ >> this time, stephanie and her team of two-term comics are comin
. then seattle should top out at 44. in the detroit area today, temperatures in the lower 40s. the reason i mentioned detroit is they want their bacon bailout. >> gretchen: they do. they want somebody to bring home the bacon and specifically, it's president obama. they say that overwhelmingly in the county where detroit is, i believe it's wayne county, michigan, more than 70% of the people voted for president obama. >> brian: michigan was closing in those last few days. >> gretchen: 73% in wayne county voted for president obama. and council woman joanne watson has her own analysis of that and has to do with bringing home some bacon. >> after the election of jimmy carter, the honorable coleman alexander young went to washington, d.c he came back home with some bacon. that's what you do. that's what you do. this is our people in an recovery whelming way supported the reelection of this president and we ought to be quid pro quo and you exercise leadership on that. of course, not just that, but why not? >> steve: i love bacon, but a lot of people hate bailouts, especially bacon bailouts. stuart
in seattle in one city as this. jenna: well, there's that. and then there's this. what about spoke smoking pot and getting behind the wheel? how do you test whether a driver is simply too high to drive? police have a big issue on their hands. we have a live report next. and we can save you 10% on ground shipping over the ups store. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfortable. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zi fre
to the 1960, which was held in seattle. many of you probably were born then. so there was this modern monorail project to ferry people around the world fair in the investors of the project at the time offered to build a monorail system is a pilot program in los angeles, traversing the harbor freeway. dad thought it was a good idea but couldn't get any of the other city fathers are county fathers to agree that this is a good investment. nobody at that time so if you ever get people out of their beloved cars. so that monorail now circles disneyland's magic kingdom in anaheim consummately. but that is a reminder to me that the biggest mistake we've made so far is not helping major transportation projects that the public can use, we'll use it will get them out of their cars. in california i believe and i think the voters of proved that time and again that high-speed rail will reduce congestion, will create jobs and will modernize the entire's tastes real system. it will reduce congestion, which is a key issue for california. transportation congestion is strangling business potential of our state a
to fix it, from lawn moyers to lamps. ones in seattle we went to see meet once a month and everyone is well come. >> this is really rewarding to actually have success story coming out. and even the things that we don't actually succeed in fixing, this is actually learning experience, to get things taken apart and see how they function and see what is wrong with it. >> reporter: well the goal is really to do away with our throwaway society. instead of buying new items they hope to teach other that is the old ones can work just as well. in an economy like this probably a good thing. kelly: sounds like a really good deal. one man's junk become's another's treasure. does it cost anything to join? >> reporter: no. the suggested ad ismation is -- admission is five dollars to rent out the meeting space. they point out you save money and help you do and of course save the planet. >> everything has built in obsolescence and minute it breaks or, the minute the newest gadget comes out people have to get the new one and throw the old one away. we don't have to live like that. it is expensive. a
and perhaps some in portland and seattle. back to you guys. >> all right, reynolds wolf. got it. >> you know, you don't lose anybody if you go wolf reynolds. we have said that. >> reynolds, he also has carl. he wants him to be carl quinn. >> you do, really? >> you hear tr people who don't do it on purpose, though, reynolds. that's the thing. you're in on it. we're all in on this together. anyway, congratulations on still being here, reynolds, and maybe we'll see you next week. >>> coming up, why share of blackberry birmingham rim popped and dropped after the bell. i'm thinking also, becky, they will buy me an iphone here. now i'm thinking i go with this new thing, this new -- >> the blackberry 10? >> yeah. all i use it for -- i don't know how to do the stuff you're supposed to do, anyway. >>> plus, speaker boehner -- >> you can get your mail on your blackberry and your ipad. >> failure to win the support in the house left congressmen from each side of the aisle with a compromise deal is possible before the end of year. s. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine c
are in seattle. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. fixed exchange rates. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was that generation's version of 2008. when that collapse happened, what you had was unsustainable debts coming irresponsible banking -- unsustainable that's, irresponsible banking. you had the collapse of the currency. it is what we have not now in greece, exactly the same. the generation that came to power in 1932 were exceptionally fearful of what would happen to the united states of america after 1944. because they very much fear
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)